Alabama Board of Pharmacy CE Programs

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When it comes to the professional practice of pharmacy and pharmaceutical sciences, it is essential to engage with the board of pharmacy of your intended state of practice. In this article, the Alabama Board of Pharmacy will be explored, focusing upon its functions, programs for continued education, and concluding with a final assessment. 

Table Of Contents

What Is the Alabama Board of Pharmacy?

What Is Their Function?

Programs for Continued Education
Conclusion

What Is the Alabama Board of Pharmacy?

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The Alabama State Board of Pharmacy was established in 1887 through legislative action in the state. The purpose of the establishment of the Alabama Board of Pharmacy was to provide for the safe regulation of the pharmacist occupation in the state of Alabama. The Alabama Board of Pharmacy was founded with the intent that the board accurately reflect the demographics of the pharmacy profession. Regulating such an essential role as that of the pharmacist is important, and something that the government and people of Alabama deemed necessary to establish.

The Alabama Board of Pharmacy has been vested with the authority to enforce Title 34, Chapter 23 of the Practice of Pharmacy Act 205 and Title 20, Chapter 2 of the Uniform Controlled Substance Act 1407. As noted by the Board of Pharmacy, the operation and management of pharmacy businesses are impactful upon the public health, safety, and welfare of the people of Alabama. Due to this, the practice of a pharmacist and pharmacy businesses are subject to regulation and control in the public interest.

The Board 

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The Alabama Board of Pharmacy is run by a Board of five members. The five members are assisted through an administrative staff that is led by a secretary appointed by the Board. The members of the Board of the Alabama Board of Pharmacy must be licensed pharmacists who have been licensed in the state of Alabama for a minimum of five years and who are actively engaged in the practice of pharmacy, pharmacy administration, or both.

Of the five members of the Alabama Board of Pharmacy's Board, three members are appointed by the Governor of Alabama. Of the three members who are appointed by the governor, one member must be engaged in the practice of pharmacy, pharmacy administration, or both, or working in a hospital. Another of the three members must be working in an independent pharmacy, and one of the three members of the Board of the Alabama Board of Pharmacy appointed by the governor must work in a chain pharmacy.

The additional two members of the Board not chosen by the governor are non-designated members and are elected by ballot. No pharmacist is allowed to serve two full terms consecutively.

At the current time, the first member of the Board is David Darby, R.Ph. He was elected by Alabama Pharmacists in the state to serve a 5-year term beginning in January of 2014. David Darby owns his own pharmacies in the region, having begun his career within the Harco Drug chain prior to launching his own business. Donna C. Yeatman, R.Ph. was appointed by Governor Robert Bentley to serve as the Chain Pharmacist member of the Board. Her career began in working for the independent pharmacy of her father and grandfather before she then began work with the Big B Drugs chain.

Ralph Sorrell is the second member of the Board selected by the pharmacists of Alabama. He is the co-owner of a community pharmacy. Brenda Reed Demson, Pharm.D., was appointed by Governor Robert Bentley to a 5-year term that began on January 1, 2017. She serves as the institutional pharmacy practice representative of the board. The final pharmacist selected by a governor that Chris Phung, who was appointed to serve as the community pharmacy representative by Governor Kay Ivey for a 5-year term beginning in January 2018. He is the pharmacy director of 11 retail pharmacies.
 

What Is Their Function?

The function of the Alabama Board of Pharmacy is supported through the direct professional experience and knowledge of the members of the Board. Each member has specific experience and information that can be used to better guide the execution, management, and regulation of the profession in the state of Alabama. The Board members work towards the establishment of regulatory practices that support the pharmacy profession in such a way that the public health and safety is best supported through the effective functioning of pharmaceutical professionals.  

The Administration

The administration of the Alabama Board of Pharmacy provides the logistical necessities required by the board to execute its functions. Within the work that must be completed by the administration there are a variety of functions that serve to support the board. The administration, such as the director of compliance Cristal Anderson, Pharm.D., is responsible for special inspections, the coordination of cases for committee review, research/response to pharmacy law or compounding inquiries, and case closure and documentation.

The Hearing Officer

The administrative hearing officer, Vance Alexander, RPh, JD, has worked as the administrative hearing officer for the Board of Pharmacy since 1997. Vance presides over disciplinary hearings including rulings on pre- and post-hearing motions and evidentiary matters, and he also drafts final orders for the review of the board. James Ward, Esq. is the lawyer for the Alabama Board of Pharmacy and has provided for the legal needs of the Board for over two decades.

Investigations

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Outside the context of the administration, there is also an investigatory wing within the Alabama Board of Pharmacy. Eddie Braden is the chief investigator of the Alabama Board of Pharmacy and has been serving in this role since 2003. Eddie's responsibilities include the supervision and coordination of case activities for investigators and the investigation of complaints and violations of the Practice of Pharmacy Act 205, Title 34 and the Alabama Uniform Controlled Substances Act 1407, Title 20.

Henry Burks has also worked within the investigatory department of the Alabama Board of Pharmacy since 1997, having retired from the Montgomery Police Department after two decades years of service. He is responsible for investigating complaints and violations of the Practice Pharmacy Act 205, Title 34 and the Alabama Uniform Controlled Substances At 1407, Title 20. Todd Brooks also works in the investigation department, and is an additional investigator who is responsible for the investigation of complaints and violations of the Practice Pharmacy Act 205, Title 34 and the Alabam Uniform Controlled Substances At 1407, Title 20.

Scott Daniel, Esq., has served as the assistant chief investigator/legal and legislative affairs since 2003. He is responsible for providing support to the Chief Investigator in the administration and operation of the enforcement division, assisting Chief Counsel in the performance of legal functions as necessary, and also provides legal guidance within the Board office in formulating answers to legal questions and opinions. Mark Delk also supports investigations alongside Richard Lambruschi and Glenn Wells.

A number of additional investigators work for the Alabama Board of Pharmacy, alongside a support staff of eight individuals who work at the additional tasks and obligations which must be performed by the Board to fulfill its obligations to the people of Alabama and the pharmacists or governors who have appointed them.

Programs for Continued Education

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For pharmacists in the state of Alabama to maintain their professional licenses and the capacity to practice, ongoing education and training is necessary. Pharmacy as with any other scientific occupation is constantly evolving and thus continuing education to keep abreast of changes in the industry is essential. Pharmacists must take programs for continuing education in the state of Alabama in order to meet the minimum requirements of the occupation. Continuing education, or CE, requirements for technicians include 3 CE hours for 2012 and 3 CE hours for 2013 in CE that is approved by the ACPE. A technician is required to complete one hour of "live" CE through attendance at a course each year. Attendance means participation in a course in which real-time interaction with the presenter is possible. Further, technicians must also complete 2 non-live hours that are approved by the ACPE. 


Pharmacists must engage in CE that is approved by ACPE. A pharmacist to meet the requirements of the Alabama Board of Pharmacy must complete at least 15 CE hours each year. A minimum of three of the 15 hours each year must be "live CE" through attendance at a course or courses. Attendance means participation in any course in which real-time interaction with the presenter is possible. The remaining 12 hours may be either live or accomplished through self-study continuing education. The Alabama Board of Pharmacy presents a number of options through which ACPE-approved CE can be found.

Conclusion

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The Alabama Board of Pharmacy is in place to enforce the imperatives of the pharmacy profession in the state of Alabama. The work of pharmacists and the management of pharmacies are occupations that have been recognized by the state of Alabama as being central to the public health of the citizens of the nation.